Systematic and Evidence-Based Approach
to Crime Reduction through Design

All built environments certified as meeting the SAFE Design Standard®  undergo a comprehensive and systematic multi-scale contextual risk analysis and multi-phase property assessment by an Accredited SAFE Design Professional™ (ASDP). Central aspects assessed are:

  • Social Context Risk
  • Site Type Risk
  • Perimeter and Gateways
  • Hard and Soft Landscapes
  • Building Envelope and Openings
  • Building Interiors

By including analyses of the unique social context and site type risks relating to a site and building – the SAFE Design Standard® ensures risks specific to a project being certified are considered during the assessment process. Once the social context and site type risks have been identified, a comprehensive assessment of the perimeter and gateways, hard and soft landscapes, building envelope and openings, and building interiors is completed. Central to the multi-phase site and building assessment is the methodical and quantitative examination of: 1) access and wayfinding, 2) visibility and natural surveillance, 3) security and manufactured surveillance, and 4) site maintenance and programming. By employing a systematic, standardized, and quantitative method of analysis, the SAFE Design Standard® affords a more reproducible, reliable, and accurate crime reduction through design assessment when compared to more traditional approaches.


ASSESSMENT DIAGRAM


The Assessment Process

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ONE
SURVEY

The principal objective of the initial survey phase is to collect the information needed to accurately register a project and proceed with the risk analysis and site and building assessment. Emerging from this survey is a comprehensive description of a property’s perimeter and gateways, total exterior space, building envelope and openings, and total interior space. Likewise, key information required for the multi-scale contextual risk analysis is collected.


TWO
REGISTRATION

The registration phase allows the SAFE Design Council to: 1) track all properties undergoing certification, 2) confirm all those involved in the certification process are Accredited SAFE Design Professionals (ASDPs), and 3) ensure the ASDPs involved in the assessment of a property have access to the resources and information needed to successfully complete their tasks.


THREE
RISK ANALYSIS

The multi-scale contextual risk analysis involves the SAFE Design Council calculating the social context and site type risk scores for a project. The findings of these two analyses inform what the unique risks are in relation to a project’s location and type. Once completed, the SAFE Design Council informs the ASDP of the unique risks, allowing the assessment to be more specific and accurate.


FOUR
ASSESSMENT

This assessment phase involves the comprehensive evaluation of a project’s perimeter and gateways, hard and soft landscapes, building envelope and openings, and building interiors. Central in the assessment process is the methodical and quantitative examination of: 1) access and wayfinding, 2) visibility and natural surveillance, 3) security and manufactured surveillance, and 4) site maintenance and programming.


FIVE
REPORT

Upon completion of the assessment phase, an ASDP must identify what design and programming modifications are needed for a project to be certified as meeting the SAFE Design Standard®. The ASDP submits a report to SAFE Design Council, which in turn will either confirm the requirements of the SAFE Design Standard® have been met, or will identify what additional modifications are required.


SIX
AUDIT

To ensure the quality, credibility, and legitimacy of the SAFE Design Standard®, the SAFE Design Council periodically requires that a project be audited. In these cases, the SAFE Design Council appoints an auditor to conduct a site and building review to confirm the design and programming considerations outlined in the ASDP’s report have in fact been fully implemented – ultimately ensuring the project meets the rigorous requirements of the SAFE Design Standard®.


SEVEN
CERTIFICATION + Re-Certification

Once the SAFE Design Council is satisfied that all the required design and programming needs stipulated by the SAFE Design Standard® have been applied, the project is certified as having met the SAFE Design Standard®. To ensure the rigorous requirements of the SAFE Design Standard® are continually observed, all certified projects must undergo re-certification every five years.